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Notes


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The Pink Cloud of Evening

December has its merry and bright times — evergreen trees with sparkling lights and glittering ornaments, the festive foods, the plum pudding, spicy cakes, and eggnog. All along the roof the eves are hung with fairy lights pretending to be icicles, and there are candles in every window. But December is also the month with the shortest days and longest nights. The dark encroaches. Marilyn Robertson’s poem, “The Pink Cloud of Evening,” has something to say about that.

Sometimes I feel I could live forever —
Like right now, listening to a Norwegian choir on the radio
and watching the last pink cloud of evening
drift over the neighbor’s field.

My ancestors came from Norway.
But they’re long dead — and I’ll die one day, too,
no matter how many clouds and choirs there are.

I ought to quit calling death the Grim Reaper.
I ought to invite him, or her, over once in a while,
like I used to invite my friends.

Can Carol come over to play, Mrs. Townsend?
Can Dorothy spend the night?

What is it about time anyway—
Whizzing through every place I’ve ever lived
as if it’s doing the hundred-yard dash?

Children are born.  And their children, grown.
The little triumphs.  The winter rains.
The voices of other children on the hill.

Twilight deepens and I start to dance,
humming a little something from Cole Porter.
Perhaps I’ll live forever after all.

You might want to rethink that,  says the dark,
coming in for its solo on the bass,
always so mellow, so sure of where it’s going.

—Marilyn Robertson

More Notes


Tim Carmody, in his excellent piece, "How Haiti Became Poor", notes that President Trump's racist policies and vulgar language have sullied the word "shithole" which used to be one of the all-time great swear words. He's right. It's another terrible power this careless President wields.