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Daily Archives: July 6, 2011

A Change of Scene

If you've been here before you'll notice that we've made a few changes. Or maybe we should avoid responsibility and say that changes have occurred. We're not experts in HTML code and as we "improve" this website odd things happen, and if we begin to improve things at 8:00 in the evening we find ourselves still working and trying to undo our
improvements at 3:00 AM. So please just read the central column and forget the surroundings. Thanks.

Senator Inouye’s Astonishing Numbers

Think you know how the US government dug itself into such a dept hole? Senator Daniel Inouye of Hawaii has come up with some astonishing numbers that shine a bright new light on our country’s national debt.

Senator Inouye

Senator Daniel Inouye

It turns out that the level of discretionary spending by the US government is unchanged compared to what it spent back in 2001. Yep, if you figure in inflation and population growth, we spend the same in that area as we did a decade ago. And, remember, back then the government had a surplus of 128 billion.

On the other hand, as you might expect, the cost of security programs is up  a boisterous 74 percent from 2001 and the cost of mandatory programs such as Social Security and Medicare is up 32.2 percent.

Hand points to text But here’s the truly surprising part. Revenues — which is to say, the amount brought in primarily from taxes — those revenues are down 18.2 percent. This is astounding: as a percent of GDP, revenues have dropped to their lowest level since 1950.

“Are we really spending too much on non-defense programs?” Senator Inouye asked “The answer is clearly no,” he said. “Non-defense discretionary spending levels are essentially unchanged from 2001. There is no reason we shouldn’t be able to afford them today.” Inouye went on to say, “The focus of our deficit talks should not be on domestic discretionary spending, but on the real reason why we are not running a surplus: historically low revenues, soaring mandatory spending, and the cost of war.”


Eugene Mirabelli, who writes most of the posts on Critical Pages, is busy completing another book, so the frequency of new posts has fallen off. Please feel free to wander back through what's here or click on one of the subjects in the tag cloud below and -- who knows? -- you may be pleasantly surprised. We hope so.